Darjeeling Silence is Deafening

Darjeeling Silence is Deafening

In West Bengal, India massive crowds are pressing for Gorkhaland statehood

Internet service in the Darjeeling Hills was disabled June 19 and service providers remain under orders not to allow online communication through July 25. The order is a security precaution to pre-empt organizers from coordinating protests throughout the region from Siliguri to Sikkim and north to the border with Nepal.

DARJEELING, West Bengal

Residents near the Sadar police station in Darjeeling normally file 30 complaints a day, mostly for petty crimes. Not a single complaint has been filed since June 9, shortly after hundreds of thousands of Gorkha began a strike for statehood now in its 33rd day.

Residents are keeping their distance from local police and riot-clad members of the Central Reserve Police Force (CRPF) following weeks of unrest in which seven people have died and hundreds more, including police, were seriously injured. Heavily armed CRPF were deployed to Darjeeling, Kalimpong, and Sonada on July 14. There are 11 CRPF companies now in place in the region but they are not under siege. In most cities, police stand watch over peaceful gatherings.

Headlines worldwide portrayed the violence with a reminder of the 1,200 killed during similar uprisings from 1986 to 1988.

Residents describe a different story.

Allan Rai is a 20-year-old studying tea management. He asked that his location and personal details remain private at this time.

The protests are orderly and residents are determined to prevail, he writes.

“On reading your recent article as well as sharing it with a few of my companions, we felt that the information you were provided was quite biased and portrayed only one side of the story,” writes Rai.

The article he is referring to appeared in World Tea News under the headline: Darjeeling Uproar Disrupts Tea Operations.

He counters with these points supporting the Gorkha protest:

  • Firstly, the ongoing movement is a mass movement not adhering to any political party. The common people of the entire region are supporting the demand for a separate state irrespective of their caste, creed, religion, and other differential status. The Gorkhas from different parts of India as well as those across the world have come in support for Gorkhaland.
  • With regards to the strike being held off for 12 hours on the auspicious occasion of Eid, our Muslim brothers and sisters are in solidarity for our demand for Gorkhaland and were willing to continue with the strike even on the day of their festival.
  • Approximately 70% of people in Darjeeling and adjoining areas of Doars depend on income from tea plantations directly or indirectly. In almost all the tea factories, 99% of the workers are the natives i.e., the Gorkhas. A separate state is the aspiration of each individual worker in these factories.
  • Tea workers were protesting for the minimum wage act, which has not been implemented in Darjeeling and Dooars. The Gorkhaland movement began stirring among tea workers who fully support the movement for a separate state. They even carry their lunch from home and actively participate in the rallies every day.
  • The movement would not have gained such vast momentum if it were not for social media. Not only the Gorkhas, but people from other communities in India and from several parts around the globe are in solidarity for the cause of Gorkhaland.
  • Gorkhaland is not a separatist movement, unlike Kashmir where they are demanding a separation from the nation entirely. Our movement is for a separate state within the Indian nation for the cause of our IDENTITY and DIGNITY that has been denied to us for the past 110 years.
  • The movement here is rather democratic and apolitical. The only visible violence is the atrocities committed by the Bengal Government by ordering forces to charge and fire bullets at peaceful protestors in broad daylight.
  • The violence on June 17 that claimed four innocent lives was due to a clash between the protestors and the armed forces. This was because on previous days these armed forces charged women and elders who were peacefully protesting. On June 16 police raided the house of the Gorkhaland Territorial Administration (GTA) chief. The media flashed that they found weapons and explosives when all that they found was an archery kit that was for training school children, agricultural tools and other traditional weapons along with two cartons of fire crackers. The media termed these “weapons and explosives.” This led to a massive rally in Darjeeling. When the armed forces tried to intervene, it led to a clash and resulted in the death of the four martyrs.

Gorkha tea worker in Darjeeling

The Current Situation

Each day thousands of tea workers from the fields join city residents at a now-familiar 10 a.m. gathering at the historic Darjeeling train station. They rally, tour the city along Mall Road and end their protest at Chowk Bazar. Some groups chant in front of the magistrate’s office. Groups of 500 to 2,000 listen as speakers from the organizing bodies address the crowd for about an hour before dispersing.

There is nothing much else for locals to do. The tea gardens are closed, the factories idle. The tourists are too scared to stay, schools are closed, outdoor sporting events canceled. Restaurants, pubs, shops, and grocers as well as banks and ATMs are locked to prevent looting, according to the Times of India.

Residents report that each day you see the same faces whether the march is for the GJM (Gorkha Janmukti Morcha), the GNLF (Gorkha National Liberation Front), the ABGL (Akhil Bharatiya Gorkha League) or the CPRM (Communist Party of Revolutionary Marxists). All support the effort to establish Gorkhaland, a state carved from the upper reaches of West Bengal.

The scene is familiar to travelers. In January in Chennai tens of thousands of protestors expressed their outrage over the ban of a traditional bull-taming contest known as jallikattu. The sport was continued.

Five years ago, thousands in Darjeeling took to the streets to peacefully protest the expansion of 50 Wal-Mart locations across India. I missed a flight to Kolkata due to the resulting congestion in every village along the 60-mile road to Bagdogra Airport.  There are many names for the protests which draw the people of India into the streets carrying signs and chanting. Nationwide a cessation of work is know as a hartal. Locally these strikes are called anishchitkal bandh (indefinite strike).

One key difference is the interruption of the internet, which has choked off contact with the Gorkha. The Hindu reports this decision has led to widespread resentment, which is being tapped into by the movement. On Monday the GJM marched to the magistrate’s office demanding that internet service be restored.

Peaceful street protests

Dangerous Precedent

“This movement is not a sudden, it has been prevalent for 110 years, however, it was highly voiced out during the year 1986 under the leadership of late Subash Ghising,” writes Allan Rai.

“During the ongoing agitation in those days my father was among the activists for the cause of Gorkhaland. The movement turned out to be violent, killing 1,200 innocent civilians as well as injuring many. Despite this violence the demand for Gorkhaland was not fulfilled,” he writes.

“Instead they settled with the Darjeeling Gorkha Hill Council (DGHC), a semi-autonomous body to look after the administration in the hills. This granting of autonomy led the masses to believe that now the hills would see better administration and development,” reports Rai.

Here is an excerpt from my upbeat report at the time:

“A new territory was carved from West Bengal’s Darjeeling district but India rejected demands for a separate state. The Gorkhaland Territorial Administration (GTA) will have powers to manage public works, social welfare, health and forests and agriculture including valued tea gardens. Existing land records will be transferred to the authority

“The agreement will end the violence in the hills of Darjeeling and pave the way for development,” newly elected West Bengal Chief Minister Mamata Banerjee told the crowd of joyous Gorkhas gathered in the village of Pintail. She praised the signing as historic. “There is nothing to fear… Bengal is not being divided. Darjeeling is close to our heart,” she said.

“There will be an elected local body, there will be schools, colleges, hospitals, jobs will be available and Darjeeling will shine,” said Banerjee who shared her vision of Switzerland as a model.

Autonomous Region Fails

“The autonomy status was just a farce and the state still continued to intervene and rule over the region, depriving it of the development it deserved,” according to Rai. “I’ve been well acquainted with this movement. Since I was a child, I heard stories about the agitation of 1986, which our loving elders referred to as the most devastating “chyassi ko andolan” one of the biggest and most violent movement in the history of Gorkhaland,” he continues.

Protests soon resumed, often involving garden workers, with frequent strikes disrupting tea production and reducing productivity.

Tensions are greater now than at anytime since the bloodshed of the 1980s.

“The agitation which has been going on for over one month will turn terrible and it will be a decisive battle for our independence,” GJM Chief Bimal Gurung told reporters Saturday night. “If I need to shed my blood I am ready to do that, but the fight will go on till Gorkhaland is achieved,” Gurung said.

So, Why Gorkhaland?

“Darjeeling tea is our pride and our heritage,” writes Rai. “It has been one of the world’s leading brands of tea. However, the tea plantations and factories in the region do not flourish or prosper to their full potential due to several reasons, one of them being inequitable distribution of monetary resource. The revenue collected from the Darjeeling tea does not return to those who produce it. Thus, there is not much monetary support to maintain the factories and the wages of the workers are very low compared to the wages of workers in other states of our country,” he writes.

“Workers are provided with facilities such as PF, Pensions that do not even amount to $15.50 (INRs1000) per month and medical facilities that are mentioned in the documents for name sake as there are no medical units or hospitals. Owing to these factors many factories in the region have been shut down. This has led to widespread unemployment resulting in deaths due to starvation as well as depression,” he said.

“When visiting tea estates, people usually meet the owners and managers of these estates. This leads them to understand only the owner’s or the manager’s point of view regarding the estates. However, they often fail to consider the daily wage workers of the estate and fail to understand or even consider the terms or the conditions in which they work to earn their minimal standard of living.

I’m sure when people drink our Darjeeling tea they sip it in delight but has anyone thought about the condition of the old lady in the garden who plucked those luscious leaves with her delicate hands? Or the ever-smiling man who turns these tea leaves into an aromatic sipping delight? Has anyone thought that even under these extreme and crucial conditions these simple workers do not fail to do their job and supply us with our world-famous brand of tea?

“The people of this region are very hardworking and generous, they work 8 hours a day for a meager amount of $2 (INRs130) per day. These workers are living in such harsh conditions yet has anyone even bothered to think about them? These are the things that one must ponder upon to realize the potential that the tea plantations will reach, if, a separate state is formed,” he concludes.

Sources: World Tea News, The Hindu, Indian Express

Next, Gorkhas speak in support of their cause:

Anjana Gurung
Anmol Gurung

Like father, like son

Only a few hours remain in the already-successful Kickstarter campaign to launch Nepal Tea, LLC. This is the time to pour it on. Donors can contribute through Wednesday, March 8. – Dan Bolton


Nischal Banskota at Kanchanjangha Tea Estate

Nishchal Banskota is 24.

He is pictured at right in his not-so-long-ago teens, perched on a rock in the family’s Kanchanjangha Tea Estate, the first tea garden in Nepal to achieve organic certification.

His father, Deepak Prakash Baskota, is nearing four score. The path these two men travel closely adheres to the ancient proverb “Like father, like son” a beloved truth first published in the 1300s but with an oral tradition as old as mankind.

Nishchal is Deepak and Dambar Baskota’s youngest son. He graduated last year from Colby-Sawyer College in New London, New Hampshire, settled in Jersey City, NJ and in May 2016 launched Nepal Tea, LLC.

Nepal Tea is one of very few companies that imports single-origin tea direct from the garden. This guarantees quality and freshness and a good return for growers who can bypass middle-men in the supply chain.

“Not only does Nepal Tea believe in providing the best quality tea to the tea drinkers around the world,” Nishchal says proudly, “It infallibly does so with the “Do Good to Others” motto and farmer’s first approach. This is what distinguishes us from the numerous commercial tea whole-sellers/retailers.”

Did you hear his resolve in that statement?

Six decades ago when his father was only 15 year old, Deepak Prakash Baskota recalls the first time he saw the thousands of hectares of tea gardens that blanket the foothills of India’s Darjeeling tea growing region. He left inspired. On returning to the village of Phidin, he shared his vision of planting a tea garden near Ranitar in the remote hilly region of Panchthar district in the rugged Himalayan foothills. In 1954 growing tea was a new concept. Villagers questioned his ambitions and his grandiose dream of one day building a tea factory.

Deepak Prakash Baskota, his wife Dambar and youngest son Nishchal

In response he decided to dive head-first into the project. First he read everything he could find to read, borrowing books to better understand what was required, and then exploring the nearby hills in search of terrain suitable for tea. Ranitar is 50 kilometers north of tea-rich Ilam but the only way to know for certain whether tea would thrive was to conduct soil tests. Deepak learned that the nearest soil laboratory was in Siliguri, West Bengal and so he walked 167 kilometers across the foothills of northern India carrying two heavy sacks of soil. The trip took three days. Later he discovered that delivering a handful of soil would have been sufficient.

Encouraged by the positive results but unable to purchase land, he and his wife, Dambar, planted the first tea trees in their backyard. Then, as the trees matured during the next four years, he invested in new plantings, visiting Darjeeling as often as possible to learn how to make tea.

Gradually villagers began to grasp the potential and offered adjacent land for expansion until there was more than 200 acres. Growers established a cooperative to sell their leaves. Eventually they produced enough leaf to require a factory which was completed in 1984.

The family prospered, making Nishchal’s childhood very different than that of his father and mother. Yet he developed the same confidence and self-motivation that led him to found a national newspaper at 17 and manage a project to build a school for underprivileged children during his college years. He volunteers for the Nepal Red Cross Society and 4 E’s Social Service programs. He worked as a financial planning analyst during his school years.

Nishchal Banskota

“While finance remains my keen interest of study, it has not limited me to explore beyond my apparent horizon and make a difference,” says Nishchal, “I constantly attempt to challenge my entrepreneurial spirit to drive change.”

Nepal Tea is a fine purveyor worthy of your donations but its mission runs deeper than commerce.

Children in Nepal do not receive a free education. One-in-four live in poverty and only 57% of Nepali adults can read and write. Banskota said a portion of tea sales are donated to a scholarship fund that has educated 2,300 students since 2002.

Nishchal would like every child of the 600 farmers who work at the Kanchanjangha Tea Estate and Research Center (KTE-RC) to have the opportunity he enjoyed.

This is your opportunity to make the vision of two generations of dreamers a reality.

Nepal Tea LLC Kickstarter campaign

A User’s Guide to Tea That You Will Use

A User’s Guide to Tea That You Will Use

Tea: A User’s Guide
Purchase at World of Tea
Eggs and Toast Media

If you are one of those who load the software and ignore the user’s guide then regret never fully utilizing its features, you need to read this book. Tea is as complex as you make it—many dunk and run, but if you savor the nuances of specialty tea and want to really immerse yourself, this book contains the most thoughtful and detailed insights of any Western author. Eggs and Toast Media, 250 pages, $20 (PDF Download at World of Tea). Also available on Kindle and in print at Amazon.com. LEARN MORE

wtn161206_teausergguide_coverA User’s Guide to Tea You will Use

Reviewed by Dan Bolton

Start with a bountiful quantity of leaf, and a second steep reveals nuances that delight. And so it is with a second reading of Tony Gebely’s remarkable new book, Tea: A User’s Guide.

As Gebely, 33, explains it: “Multiple steeps allow us to achieve snapshots of the tea as dissolution begins, runs its course, and slowly putters out…. These snapshots accentuate nuances in the tea that may become muffled during longer infusions.”

His brilliant 250-page work distills and organizes hundreds of posts from the award-winning World of Tea blog that established Gebely’s reputation for clarity on a complex topic. The blog has twice been named best blog in the annual World Tea Awards.

Tea contains an estimated 30,000 polyphenolic compounds, writes Gebely in an opening chapter on tea chemistry that introduces the pigments, enzymes, amino acids, carbs, volatiles, and mineral building blocks that make tea such a remarkable beverage.

The body of the book describes 130 classic specialty teas with the precision of a high-level computer scientist. Gebely works as a chief technology and integration officer and has assisted several tea retailers configure web and in-store software. He applies rigorous conformity throughout the book; every tea is photographed (leaves and liquor) in a cup that holds precisely 20 cubic centimeters of water from Clairvic Spring in Volvic, France. The pH-neutral water contains 130 parts per million of total dissolved solids with a mineral content in mg/l of calcium (12), sulfates (9), potassium (6), silica (32), and chlorides (15).

Tony Gebeley

Tony Gebely

A second read prompted a dozen margin notes underscoring the points he makes about preparation and the insights he offers in the chapter on processing. In his introduction, he establishes that “this book isn’t about all tea. It’s about specialty tea. The goal of this book is to celebrate the diversity of fresh, complex loose-leaf specialty teas.”

Gebely provides the knowledge needed to develop a personal style of tea appreciation, particularly salient in the West, where brewing tea is mainly “dunk and run.” There are few mentions of tea culture in this reference: “Early on while writing this manuscript, I realized that by separating tea culture from objective tea study, we are left with a much better framework for tea education,” he writes.

What Western tea drinkers need is to hone their skills in selecting and preparing fine tea. Gebely’s simple steeping chart is a starting point. Instead of the typical manufacturer’s temp and timer icons, Gebely introduces a grid.

 

WTN161206_TeaUserGuide_GreenTea

Blocks represent a safe zone of both time and temperature given the recommended dosage.

“Your ideal parameters may vary, especially the steeping time,” he writes, explaining the relationship between dosages, time, and temperature.

This user’s guide is just that, explaining tea chemistry and processing and presenting historical background (without mythology) covering a most intriguing collection of teas. He offers a very useful explanation for establishing “altered tea” as the seventh main category.

The majority of teas sold in the United States are altered in some way, observes Gebely. Some of the most exquisite specialty teas (think jasmine scented) are altered. The category embraces flavored and scented teas, blends that feature inclusions such as fruit, nuts, and florals along with breakfast blends of pure teas that deliver consistency in flavor despite the annual variance of the harvest. Herein lies masala chai and Japanese genmaicha, a mix of sencha and roasted rice and beloved Earl Grey, a tea flavored with oil of bergamot that accounts for a quarter of U.S. tea consumed by volume.

Gebely’s diverse tea descriptions demonstrate the 35 nations that grow tea and offer a style for every taste. However, more critical, in his view, is giving readers the confidence to brew any tea they might want to try.

In The Kinetics of Steeping section, some 182 pages in, Gebely announces “the most important part… the entire reason for your tea journey.

“Steeping is the final step in the lives of tea leaves. And in their final act, they slowly unfold and unravel, creating a beverage that tells the story of where they came from. Every time we drink liquor from the steeped leaves, it tell us what the weather was like before they were plucked and how they were handled, processed, and stored before they reached your cup,” writes Gebely.

It is these chapters on preparation, including tea evaluation, and storage that the margin notes in your edition will likely equal or even exceed the margin notes in mine.

wulong-tea-chart WTN161206_white-tea-chart WTN161206_TeaUsersGuide_YellowTea

Never at a loss for words…

Never at a loss for words…

Tea Journey Magazine was funded at dawn by more than 560 backers who contributed $128,000 during the past 60 days…

To our backers around the world:

Those who know me well, know that I’m never at a loss for words… until now.

Tea Journey was funded at dawn — fittingly by donations from tea lovers on the other side of the world in China and Australia as their day was winding down.

I fell asleep at 5am and awakened to the news with tears of joy…. and relief.

Today is DAY ONE. We can now get on with the joyous task of producing the world’s first truly global, truly collaborative magazine for tea lovers. Its creation demonstrates a rare ability to bridge borders and cultures, to share the stories of the tea lands that introduce growers and artisans to the millions who cherish their labor of love.

You can expect the inaugural issue and both the iOS and Android apps to be ready by the end of the month.

On behalf of the Tea Journey partners and advisors, writers and editors.

Thank you.

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WINNIPEG, Canada

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Where do the most recent Tea Journey backers live? Here are their names and the home countries of some of the final 50 donors who contributed to the campaign:

Gordon Zhang, China | Margaret Cusak, Australia |Roquen Lómë, Prague Czech Republic | Marc-André Rivet, Montreal, Canada | Richard Tao, US | Jesse Örö, Finland | Debbie Forlanski, Canada | Goh Cheng Fai, Hong Kong | Danny Moortgat, Belgium | Scott Svihula, Florida | Nancy Cocianchi, Argentina | Nigel Melican, UK | Sabine Jürgenmeier, Germany | Wouter Verelst, Malawi | Ernestas Klevas, Frederiksberg, Denmark | Stefano Grassi, Italy |

There is power in this venture that speaks to community more than cash…

The other day, inspired by Jennifer English, the @urbanmommies hosted an online fundraiser for Tea Journey that resulted in nearly 300,000 direct contacts and 5 million social impressions on Twitter and greatest single-day tally of subscribers during the campaign.

The entire world is thirsty for tea knowledge. While the US is home to the largest number of backers, Canada, I’m proud to say, has the largest concentration of subscribers. Tea drinking UK is exploring more diverse teas as are India and Australia. Those in China and Taiwan and Asian tea lands are next, not for lack of knowledge but out of a desire to better understand the markets where they send their precious tea. Gourmands in Western Europe (Germany-France-Benelux) placed their countries high on the list. There are South American fans from seven countries (Argentina tops the list followed by Brazil where out of the goodness of their hearts tea lovers Victoria Bosogno (Spanish) and Kelly Stein (Portuguese) translated and then forwarded the Tea Journey message). Those from tea lands in Africa (including the Middle East) follow. Backers hail from CIS and the Czech Republic, from Mexico and the Caribbean islands and even Iceland where Frank Woolny was the ninth backer to contribute.

The first? That was Peter Wilson, who inspired us with these words:

“…with every tea I taste, and every word I read, I sink deeper into such a joyful state of being that I want to keep going and going. It’s a bit challenging sometimes to find good information about tea in the west, so when I learned of this magazine, not only did I decide that I would contribute, I set my alarm for 12am the morning that the Kickstarter campaign opened, in the hope that I could say I was first to contribute! I’ve told all of my friends, and I’ve also sent letters to all of my favorite tea suppliers (like Harney, DAVIDsTEA, Tea Trekker, and Tea Source), asking them to consider supporting and encouraging more people to become enthusiasts like me. Thank you for all that you do, and best of luck with your magazine! I’m privileged to say that I support it, and I look forward to continuing my own tea journey.”

Backers believe passionately in our mission: Listed below are some of those who donated in the past week to put us over the top.

Mehmet Emin Akyuz, Stephan Baudet, Lorraine Collins, Shawn Geitner, Christopher Day, Peter Ericson, Amethyst Bussey, Nathan Hevenstone, John Alfone, Jaime Chartrand, Eva Lee, Mark O’Deady, Faye Lang, Guy Sirkes, Barbara Broido, Shari Bayer, Jen Piccotti, Joyce Maio, Najat Abdou, Pamela Tucker, Ruth Tobias, Laurence Wooding, Glen Knauer, Dominik Wittenberg, Sean Mates, Rick Ha, Margo Sparto, Raelene Gannon, Kaiting Zhou, David Bess, Brett Holmes, Ellie Chu, Rick Doten, Lisa Braithwaite, Cindy Beeman, Samantha Molineaux, Barb Goldstein, Linda Gaylard, Geena Matuson, Mark Nicholls, Dawn Hoffman, Jeffrey Lorien, Sophia Nadur, Michelle Rabin, Matt Jaffe, Bob Krul, Noah Van der Laan, Andre Gauthier, Rona Tison, Manuel Legault-Roy…

What powered this extraordinary event?

The generosity of Founding Sponsors:

Camellia Sinensis | Seven Cups Fine Chinese Teas | Young Mountain Tea | Craftea | Mad Monk | Misty Peak Teas | Jalam Teas| Tea Squared | Tealet | Australian Tea Masters | Adagio Teas | Nothing But Tea | Teatrade | Yunomi Tea | Firsd Tea | Smacha Tea Company | Hong China Tea | Teatulia | Lochan Tea Company | Mighty Leaf Tea Company | International Tea Importers | International Tea Masters Association | Rolling Leaf | El Club del Te | Rishi Tea | Tea Total | Teatrade Mart | TeaLula | The Green Teaist | World Tea Podcast | Tea Lifestyle | World Tea Academy | P&T – Paper & Tea GmbH | The Daily Tea | Wild Qi Tea | Tea Vivre | Conundrum Tea | Tea Cosmos | The Tea Emporium | Teas Etc | UK Tea Academy | Mary Cotterman | Royal Tea New York | ITO EN | JoJo Tea | G.S. Haly Co. | Hawaiian Rainforest Tea | 4 Track Tea | Ocha & Co | Hankook Tea | Eco-Cha |

(This is a partial list with more signing on daily through the end of World Tea Expo, June 15-17 in Las Vegas, drop by and see us at Booth 251. If your company is interested in becoming a Founding Sponsor email: dan.bolton@teajourney.pub, liz.eaton@teajourney.pub, hans.niebergall@teajourney.pub or suzette.hammond@teajourney.pub):

How many people support Tea Journey…

It’s an astronomical, gratifying, amazingly large number of people around the globe.

Google Analytics shows that TeaJourney.pub has attracted visitors from 85 countries. Literally every country in Western Europe where subscribers from UK and Germany lead; seven countries in South America, twelve countries in Africa, the Middle East, Turkey, Iran. India is home to the fourth largest number of subscribers There is great support for Tea Journey in Nepal and PakiMARKETING-KickstarterProjectsWeLovestan and Sri Lanka.

There are only four countries in all of Asia where tea lovers have have not visited the website… Iceland and the Caribbean Islands are represented. We love island people from the Azores and Madagascar and the Philippines to Indonesia, Malaysia, Australia and New Zealand. Frank Miller paved the way inThailand and Vietnam. A special shout to Kevin Gasgoyne and Jeff Fuchs in my beloved Canada. There are now 600+ paid subscribers and more than 10,000 names on our free newsletter list.

In thirty days, how can this be?

Let me share a quick story: On Thursday Tea Journey was invited to attend a blazingly fast and fun #TwitterParty hosted by @urbanmommies, an online community of mothers founded by Jill Amery. A TwitterParty is a moment-in-time chat room that afforded us an opportunity to share our love for tea and trivia with @urbanmommies. Jill made a special appeal to support our Kickstarter project in the closing days of the campaign.

Together the Tea Journey team generated hundreds of tweets that led to hundreds more re-tweets that encouraged thousands of tea lovers to echo their support — which mushroomed into hundreds of thousands of individual contacts.

That single one-hour event brought us to the attention of almost 300,000 individual members of the @urbanmommies online community and their friends and it generated 5 million impressions globally. It was the GENIUS-INSPIRED work of Jennifer English… executed with precision by the Tea Journey partners, writers and marketing staff.

Early in the week Jennifer English sent out a call that mobilized her friends to organize an online contest with prizes for participants. Marketing director Ashley Sostaric-Finkes and her marvelous social media assistant Alexandra Enns joined the stream with the help of contributing editors Nicole Martin, Dan Robertson and Jennifer Quail, and bloggers Rachael Carter and Geoffrey Norman; and contributors Elyse Petersen and tea companies including Seven Cups and A Gift of Tea, Scandalous Tea and Tea Wagon.

Together we shot a single bright beam in the night typing so fast we got lost in the moment. The resulting surge made Friday our single biggest day for paid subscribers.

There is still work to do. We have only three days and we are still $4,000 short of our goal. Backers have contributed more than $10,000 in the last 10 days.

Together we can do this.  The entire tea world is watching. Wednesday June 1 is the deadline. Click here to show your support.

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Tea Journey: A Kickstarter “Project We Love”

Tea Journey: A Kickstarter “Project We Love”

MARKETING-KickstarterProjectsWeLove

Badges for Projects We Love

The Kickstarter Blog ·
To date, there have been more than 280,000 creative projects on Kickstarter — phew! Whether you’re a backer looking to find great ideas, or a creator looking for inspiration for your own project (or both), we want to help you find compelling ideas that are thoughtfully presented, exciting, and that bring communities together. With this in mind, we’re excited to introduce Projects We Love, a simple way for us to feature projects that go the extra mile.

MARKETING-KickstarterImageProjects We Love is an evolution of Staff Picks, a feature we used in the past to connect creators and backers around best-in-class projects. The difference is that Projects We Love automatically get a nice little badge, so that everyone can tell when we’re extra excited about a project. Projects We Love are featured by a team that works to surface extra-bright projects. They’re not paid endorsements, and like any other project, they retain complete creative independence. Most simply, a Project We Love badge is a show of respect and enthusiasm from us at Kickstarter.

Take a look at some existing Projects We Love, and you’ll see well-crafted videos, striking images, a clear plan, an excited community, and a lot of creativity. While there’s no recipe for making a Project We Love, we do have some tips on how to get featured. We also send out a newsletter every week featuring three Projects We Love — sign up to receive it, and you’ll be on your way to discovering world-class projects that delight and inspire.
Onwards and upwards!

Kickstarter
Reprinted from the Kickstarter Blog

Friends in Tea

Last week donors pledged $15,000 to bring Tea Journey to life.

As you read this note our total paid subscriptions will top 325 and our Kickstarter campaign will have reached nearly 30% of the final goal. There are now 30 days left in the campaign. Many Kickstarter ventures are fully funded in a 30-day window but we need to act quickly to draw attention to our “replenish rewards.”

We need to make the most of each day…

Founding sponsors have committed an additional 1,000 packets of tea and several new tea experience rewards totaling $20,000. This boosts the value of Tea Journey rewards to $95,000 USD (our current goal).

The word is getting out. We have 185 Kickstarter subscribers (and another 130 who subscribed direct from the website). They hail from Iceland and Indonesia to Eastern Europe, India, UK and New Zealand. Those who see the prototype tell us they love it.

The combination of support from bloggers, media and social media has brought us this far but reaching goal depends on peer-to-peer appeals to your friends in tea. Eighty-two percent of our Kickstarter donors are friends in tea. They are responding to short personal notes at a rate of 1% – that’s 5 per 500 notes sent.

A simple note is all it takes: 70% of millennials prefer a “peer” endorsement and rely on non-celebrity bloggers over the glitz and glam of stars. Only 3% of the 14,000 consumers surveyed by Collective Bias say they even consider buying a product endorsed by a celebrity.

The articles, images and video in Tea Journey are authentic, unvarnished, detailed and devoted to tea. Your note should be the same.

Do these five things and we will be celebrating our success on June 1.

1) Open a PayPay account and add $30 (for up to 500 names). GreenInbox only accepts PayPal payments.
2) Signup for GreenInbox.com (and select and upload either your Facebook friends, Twitter followers, Linkedin connections or email contact list). Click the check box beside the names of everyone you think will be interested in Tea Journey (up to 500).
3) Personalize the note below.
4) Click send.

If you are short of cash I will be happy to reimburse you…. better yet, send a note to dan@tea-biz.com with your Paypal email and I will send you $30 in advance.

I emailed 317 appeals this week and there were 60%+ opens resulting in several donors.

I know a lot of people but not nearly enough to reach the Kickstarter goal.

If you help us by doing this, I am convinced that together the tea community will reach the $96,000 goal but it needs to be done now…. send as many as you can as quickly as practical. It takes donors several days to evaluate the magazine. In many instances it takes appeals from three or four of you to tip the scale.

Tomorrow is too late.

Dan

SAMPLE LETTER

Dear (or Hello, or Hi) <first_name>

Tea Journey magazine presents authentic and elusive tea knowledge translated from publications in China and other tea lands. The mobile app and website is a collaboration between western tea journalists and tea experts to introduce readers to the world’s finest gardens and teas. Choose from these awesome tea rewards: https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/teajourney/tea-journey-magazine
I did!
Your Name

GreenInbox ADVICE

1) Focus the message on the recipient, not you.
2) Make the message positive
3) Keep the message short.
4) Include a clear call to action.
5) Do not use short links (like bit.ly)

Most email providers (like gmail) will mark your message as spam if it includes bit.ly, goo.gl, tinyurl etc. Moreover, better to use the full link since people like to know what’s the target web page. Using the full link will increase the number of people that actually click on it. https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/teajourney/tea-journey-magazine